ICIAM Prizes for 2011

prize-winners embargoed until 20 September 2010

Access to the names and details of the prize recipients is now available available before the embargo date/time only to those with a valid password to everyone, as a PDF document (~4.5 Mbyte).

To everyone else: please return here after 6:00pm EST (e.g. Sydney) 20 September 2011.
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At the Opening Ceremony of the 2011 ICIAM Congress in Vancouver, five ICIAM prizes were awarded:
(presentation)
  • ICIAM Collatz Prize  awarded to Emmanuel Candès (Stanford & Pasadena, USA).

    CandesE-sm.jpg The Collatz Prize was established to provide international recognition to individual scientists under 42 years of age for outstanding work on industrial and applied mathematics.
    It was created on the initiative of GAMM, and first awarded in 1999.
    Carrying a cash award of USD 1000, the Collatz Prize is presently funded by GAMM.

    Emmanuel J. Candès of Stanford University and of the California Institute of Technology is awarded the 2011 ICIAM Collatz Prize in recognition of his outstanding contributions to numerical solution of wave propagation problems and compressive sensing, as well as anisotropic extensions of wavelets.

  • ICIAM Lagrange Prize  awarded to Alexandre J. Chorin (Berkeley, USA).

    ChorinA-sm.jpg The Lagrange Prize was established to provide international recognition to individual mathematicians who have made an exceptional contribution to applied mathematics throughout their careers.
    It was created on the initiative of SMAI, SEMA and SIMAI and first awarded in 1999.
    Carrying a cash award of USD 3000, the Lagrange Prize is presently funded by the three member societies SMAI, SEMA and SIMAI.

    Alexandre J. Chorin of University of California Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory receives the 2011 ICIAM Lagrange Prize in recognition of his fundamental and original contributions to applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and turbulence modelling. His methods for the numerical solution of Navier–Stokes equations stand at the basis of the most popular codes in computational fluid mechanics.

  • ICIAM Maxwell Prize  awarded to Vladimir Rokhlin (New Haven, USA).

    RokhlinV-sm.jpg The Maxwell Prize was established to provide international recognition to a mathematician who has demonstrated originality in applied mathematics.
    It was created on the initiative of the IMA (with the support of the J.C. Maxwell Society), and first awarded in 1999.
    Carrying a cash award of USD 1000, the Maxwell Prize is presently funded by IMA.

    Vladimir Rokhlin of Yale University has been selected for the 2011 ICIAM Maxwell Prize for his work on fast multipole methods which have revolutionized fields like numerical electromagnetism for radar and molecular dynamics for chemistry.

  • ICIAM Pioneer Prize  awarded to James Albert Sethian (Berkeley, USA).

    SethianJ-sm.jpg The Pioneer Prize was established for pioneering work introducing applied mathematical methods and scientific computing techniques to an industrial problem area or a new scientific field of applications.
    It was created on the initiative of SIAM, and was first awarded in 1999.
    Carrying a cash award of USD 1000, the Pioneer Prize is presently funded by SIAM.

    James Albert Sethian of the University of California Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory receives the 2011 ICIAM Pioneer Prize for his fundamental methods and algorithms which have had a large impact in applications such as in imaging and shape recovery in medicine, geophysics and tomography and drop dynamics in inkjets.

  • ICIAM Su Buchin Prize  awarded to Edward Lungu (Gabarone, Botswana).

    LunguE-sm.jpg The Su Buchin Prize was established to provide international recognition of an outstanding contribution by an individual in the application of Mathematics to emerging economies and human development, in particular at the economic and cultural level in developing countries.
    It was created on the initiative of the CSIAM, and is being awarded for the second time.
    Carrying a cash award of USD 1000, the Su Buchin Prize is presently funded by CSIAM.

    Edward Lungu of the University of Botswana receives the 2011 ICIAM Su Buchin Prize for his mathematical modelling of problems related to Africa and his fundamental contribution to developing teaching, research and organizational structures for applied mathematics in Southern Africa.


site by Ross Moore, for ICIAM.
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